A Pampering Maine Vacation Begins with a Spa Treatment

You’re planning your next vacation, and your husband says, “Let’s go to Maine this summer! I hear that a vacation in Maine is great – sun, surf, golf, hiking . . . what more could you ask for?”

There are many women for whom this overture would be music to the ears. On the other hand, a fair number equate “vacation” with a bit more pampering than a hike up a mountain or a day frolicking in the waves has to offer. For them, a Maine vacation is indeed the perfect choice as the options for pampering are as plentiful as the hiking trails and beaches in Maine.

Maine’s seacoast stretches from the southern communities of York and Ogunquit all the way “Down East” to the rural area that includes Lubec, Eastport and Machias. While a visit to Maine’s beaches is high on the list of those planning a visit, there is much more to see and do in the state, including a visit to these less visited communities known for their blueberries and hardy lobstermen. Many beautiful and pristine islands can be accessed from ferries taken from Portland or ports throughout the midcoast region. The midcoast region is perhaps the perfect spot for combining the activity desired with the relaxation needed on your vacation. Spots like the Sebasco Harbor Resort provide a spectacular ocean view from cottage units or their unique “lighthouse” lodgings, is host to a top-notch golf course and allow visitors to access nearly all aspects of Maine’s vacationer paradise. And best of all, the Sebasco Harbor Resort is home to the Fairwinds Spa. Fairwinds offers everything from massage to facials to manicure and pedicure services to its guests.

Plan your trip to Maine with confidence, as everyone can enjoy its beauty, its excitement, and its relaxation with the proper planning and lodging selection.

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The Benefits Of Maple Syrup

Real maple syrup comes from sap that is drawn from sugar maple trees. This sap is boiled until the water has been evaporated, which takes several hours as forty gallons of sap will only make one gallon of the syrup. The art of harvesting this sap and effectively boiling it for cooking purposes has been around for decades. Some suggest that the tradition started with the North American Indians. Now it is mostly produced in Canada, although some northern American states produce it as well.

Most of us have been warned that syrup is not such a healthy food. And there are a lot of other substitutes on the market that are packed full of pure sugar. But the real thing: real maple syrup, it actually not so bad for you.

Turns out that slathering your pancakes with maple syrup is not such a bad idea. Some recent studies have shown that this substance from the sugar maple is actually packed with a number of essential vitamins and minerals.

One ounce of this sweet liquid contains forty six percent of the recommended daily value of maganese, a mineral that helps provide antioxidant defenses for our bodies. It also contains a lot of zinc, eight percent of the daily value. There are also a good number of omega 6 fatty acids found in the substance. In addition to these minerals, there are over twelve other minerals found in small amounts that are very healthy for the body.

While this syrup does have a lot of calories, it still is a much better choice than other types that you may choose to pour over your breakfast. Sugar has no nutritional value, and this is what most other varieties basically consist of. Why not choose something that can be beneficial to your health and yummy, too?

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Prism Glass Gallery and Café – Rockport, Maine

Lisa Sojka

Lisa Sojka

Prism Glass Gallery and Café is quickly earning its place on the “must see” lists of Maine’s visitors and natives alike. This unique destination is conveniently located on Route 1 in Rockport, at 297 Commercial Street.

The premise is genius, really. The Boston Globe calls it a “one-of-a-kind” experience. And where better to have a one-of-a-kind experience than in a one-of-a-kind port like the romantic harbor of Rockport, Maine? Since 2004, Prism Glass Gallery and Café has been serving up fine-food and fine glass art under one roof. Based on the number of faithful denizens, the ambiance must be somewhat addictive.

Chef Lisa Sojka and artist Patti Kissinger opened Prism Glass Gallery and Café in April of 2004. Each of these woman brings a unique background, perspective, and personality to the establishment.

Patti Kissinger

Patti Kissinger

Lisa grew up in Indiana, dreaming about a nursing career. In pursuit of this dream, she earned a degree in biology. Yet one semester shy of graduation, she changed course and plunged into cooking. She traveled to Bologna, Italy, to attend cooking school, and interned on a barge in France. She has honed her skills by cooking in and managing restaurants in Tennessee and Pennsylvania. Discovering that she was also drawn to glass, Lisa ran a 6,000 square foot glass art business in Nashville, with glass blower Patti Kissinger.

lamb kabobs

lamb kabobs

In 2003, Sojka and Kissinger decided to close the Nashville Gallery. The gallery’s 8-year run had earned the women a national reputation, but they were ready for a change. They wanted to find a smaller locale, and a slower pace. They hopped into a borrowed motor home, along with a 13-year-old Dalmatian, and set out to find a new home. Kissinger said, “We set out looking for a different quality of life, but landing in Rockport was really a wonderful accident.” Prior to this wonderful accident, they considered towns in Massachusetts, Vermont, and Rhode Island, but Mainers old and new are grateful that the dynamic pair landed where they did.

Lisa is not alone in the kitchen. Chef Timothy Pierre Labonte, a graduate of Johnson and Wales, is renowned for his gourmet cuisine. An international wine selection is available with brunch and dinner.

Glass Vase

Glass Vase

The Café offers comfort food. The menu is Italian based, yet loaded with local and fresh flavor and style. People used to “meat and potatoes” will find something to their liking, as will those seeking a gourmet adventure. In the summer months, guests enjoy dining in a spacious outdoor garden, and next to the barn where Kissinger demonstrates her glass blowing.

The gallery has been named one of the “Top 100 Retailers of American Craft” by Niche Magazine. Artists featured include: Josh Simpson, Rob Levin, Sam Stang, Barry Entner, Caleb Nichols, Elizabeth Mears, and Christopher Ries.

The gallery is open Wednesday through Saturday, from 10 to 9, and Sunday until 3. The restaurant is open Wednesday through Saturday. Lunch is served from 11 to 3, dinner, from 5 to 9. On Sundays, brunch is served from 10 until 3, dinner, from 4 to 7.

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Windsor Chairmakers – Lincolnville Maine

Windsor Chair

Windsor Chair

Even if you are not in the market for a new Windsor chair, a trip to Windsor Chairmakers in Lincolnville might change your mind. And even if it doesn’t, your visit will at least peak your interest. At the very least, you would get to see Windsor chairs being crafted, and you would get to “talk Windsors” with the pros. The pros being owners Jim and Nance Brown, and several craftsmen and women who truly know their trade, and are happy to share it with you.

Windsor chairs are a vital piece of Americana. A Windsor chair is a chair built with a wooden seat and a high-spoked back. They usually have outward-slanting legs, which are connected by a crossbar. They are often built from steamed and bent pieces of wood. That’s real wood — not processed wood chips glued together — Windsor chairs are the real McCoy. They came to America, from England, so early in our history, that many of our colonists were still living with very few pieces of furniture. These chairs, which could be fashioned from the abundant wood of the colonies, offered early settlers what seemed to them like lush comfort. Americans are still finding them comfortable today. Comfortable, beautiful, and functional. What could be better?

Slant desk & windsor chair

Slant desk & windsor chair

Windsor Chairmakers offers their guests a showroom, consisting of two entire houses, filled with Windsor chairs, tables, dressers, and highboys. One section of the spacious showroom is dedicated to Shaker style furniture, including chairs, benches, and stools.

Each piece at Windsor Chairmakers is individually bench-crafted onsite, in a classic New England barn, and finished in the customer’s choice of paints, dyes, and glazes. All pieces are made with attention and care, and according to the customer’s specifications.

Chest

Chest

Windsor Chairmakers is located on US Route 1 in Lincolnville, just 6 miles north of Camden. They are open 7 days a week, from June through October, from 9 to 5. During the rest of the year, Windsor Chairmakers is open Monday through Friday. Can’t get there soon enough? They offer various shipping options.

Know that you are in good company when you see your name up on the “Customer Wall.” For over 19 years, Windsor Chairmakers has kept a list of customers’ names. The list is over 4,000 names long. In a time when doing things right, when knowing the hands that build your treasures, when knowing your money goes to real people with real faces, are all rarities, Windsor Chairmakers remains tried-and-true. Call (207) 789-5188 for more information.

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